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How Fiber Can Help You Detox

Before you roll your eyes at the idea of another detox fad, we’ll be the first to tell you: Fiber is different.

Also known as roughage or bulk, fiber is a part of plant-based food that your body can’t digest or absorb. It coasts through your gastrointestinal tract, aiding the digestive process along the way. (Hippocrates praised its benefits in 430 B.C., so it’s far from being a new trend!) While doing so, fiber can sweep toxins from your body. Here’s the rundown on how fiber can work as a detox. 

Fiber can curb your cravings for unhealthy foods.

One of the benefits of fiber—particularly soluble fiber, which expands with water—is that it keeps you feeling full for longer after you eat. That means you’re less tempted to indulge in junk food that can make your gut unhappy. In this way, fiber kinda helps you detox proactively, right?

One of the benefits of fiber—particularly soluble fiber, which expands with water—is that it keeps you feeling full for longer after you eat.

Fiber can move unhealthy food through your gut faster.

Insoluble fiber, which doesn’t absorb water, speeds up the digestion process. In doing so, it helps your body get rid of waste even faster, before it can build up in your body and make you feel not-so-great.

Fiber can feed the bacteria in your gut that keeps toxins away.

Your gut is home to millions of teensy microorganisms that serve a mighty purpose: Keeping you safe from invaders and stuff that’s bad for you. (These little guys account for two-thirds of your immune system!) Known as your gut microbiome, these bacteria function best when they’re healthy and well-fed. Prebiotic fiber is a type of fiber that can help, by nourishing your gut bacteria with everything it needs to help you detox.

Fiber can benefit your liver and kidneys, which help you detox.

By helping to keep your gut microbiome in tip-top shape, fiber also benefits your liver and kidneys. Your gut supplies blood to these organs, which act like Avengers for your body, filtering out villains—or waste and toxins, rather. 

Dietary fiber has also been linked to increased antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes in the liver, and reducing your kidneys’ burden of processing nitrogen, which instead gets absorbed by the gut. 

If you still struggle to get enough fiber, supplements can help pick up the slack.

How can I get more fiber in my diet?

The FDA recommends that women get 25 grams of fiber daily and that men get 38 grams, but 95 percent of Americans don’t get near these goals. You can increase your fiber intake with foods like oats, beans, avocados, and sweet potatoes. 

If you still struggle to get enough fiber, supplements can help pick up the slack. Consider an all-natural daily supplement like Bellway, which is made with soluble, prebiotic psyllium husk fiber, no artificial ingredients, and zero sugar to make your gut even happier. As with any supplement, confirm with your doctor that it’s right for you.

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